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February 12, 2019 in Information Literacy

INFORMATION FOR SBU AUTHORS

WHY RETAIN RIGHTS?

  • Many publishers create significant barriers for authors who want to reuse or share their work, and for access to that work by others. Negotiating changes to standard publisher agreements can help authors avoid these obstacles, thus increasing options for authors as well as readership, citation, and impact of the work itself. (Openly available articles have been shown to be more heavily cited.)
  • Publishers routinely change the agreements they ask authors to sign. If you have not secured rights you want as an author, the publisher may alter its practices over time.
  • Making research and scholarship as widely available as possible supports SBU’s mission “to carry out research and intellectual endeavors of the highest international standards that advance knowledge and have immediate or long-range practical significance.”
  • Some research funders request or require that work created with their funds be made available openly on the web. Their policies can be reviewed at the “Juliet” site. Other institutions also have open access policies or mandates.

WHICH RIGHTS TO RETAIN?

  • SBU authors are often most interested in retaining rights to:
    • Reuse their work in teaching, future publications, and in all scholarly and professional activities.
    • Post their work on the web (sometimes referred to as “self-archiving”) e.g. in Academic Commons, SBU’s research repository; in a discipline archive (such as PubMed Central or arXiv ; or on a web page.

HOW TO RETAIN RIGHTS?

  • Authors should specify the rights they want to retain, as most publishers do not extend these rights to authors in their standard agreements.
  • One simple way to retain rights is to use the Copyright Amendment Form.
  • This form enables authors to continue using their publications in their academic work; to deposit them into SBU Academic Commons; and to deposit them into any discipline-based research repository (including PubMed Central, the National Library of Medicine’s database for NIH-funded manuscripts).

WHICH PUBLISHERS ARE LIKELY TO BE FLEXIBLE ABOUT THESE RIGHTS?

  • Publisher policies and agreements vary considerably. The “Romeo” database offers a convenient summary of many publisher copyright policies & self-archiving.
  • Publisher policies and agreements are usually linked from the author information or article submission section of a journal’s website.
  • Publisher policies change over time, and the terms stated on their websites often vary from the terms of their actual agreements, so it is important to read the agreement itself.

WHERE DO I GO WITH QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE ISSUES?

Resources

How do you know a journal is legitimate?

February 12, 2019 in Information Literacy

As a researcher or scholar under pressure to publish, you may accept solicitations to submit articles for publication even if you are not familiar with the journal or publisher. Some of these offers are legitimate but others turn out to be scams perpetrated by predatory publishers. It is wise to take a few basic steps to learn more about a new or unfamiliar scholarly journal.  If you have questions, or want to discuss scholarly publishing, contact Darren Chase, Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication:  darren.chase@stonybrook.edu | 631.632.9830.

Great research deserves a great publisher.

Great research deserves a great publisher.

GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATING JOURNALS AND PUBLISHERS

About the Journal

  • Discover peer-reviewed journals using library search tools
  • Examine the aims and scope: are they appropriate for your research?
  • Review past issues: does the content look topical and credible? Are the authors known to you?
  • Investigate it’s history of article retractions using Retraction Watch
  • If open access, is it registered in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) The DOAJ vets journals before listing them.
  • Does the website provide complete contact information: email, street address, working phone number?
  • Does it have a valid online ISSN?
  • Journals are disseminated via research databases (academic abstracting and indexing services) such as JSTOR, PubMed, EBSCOhost, ProQuest (even Google Scholar).  A journal website should say where it is indexed.
    • Is it indexed in the places it says it is?
  • Has it been assigned ranking(s)? E.g.
  • Are its policies on peer review, open access, copyright publicly available?
    • If it charges publication fees, are they clearly stated and explained?
    • What are the copyright policies? Will you be able to preserve copyright over your work? If you are required to meet a public access mandate to share your research, are the copyright policies compatible?  In many open access journals, authors retain full copyright to their work and give the journal a “non-exclusive” right to publish the work.

About the Publisher

What is the Creative Commons?

February 8, 2017 in Digital Humanities, Information Literacy

Creative Commons is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting an open and accessible internet that is enriched with free knowledge and creative resources for people around the world to use, share, and cultivate. Creative Commons provides free tools that let authors, scientists, artists and educators easily mark their creative work with the freedoms they want it to carry. You can use CC to change your copyright terms from “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved”.

Whenever you snap a photograph, record a song, publish an article, or put your original writing online, that work is automatically considered “all rights reserved” in the eyes of copyright law. In many cases, that means that other people can’t reuse or remix your work without asking for your permission first. But what if you want others to reuse your work? If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, consider publishing under a Creative Commons license. You decide which rights you’d like to keep, and it clearly conveys to those using your work how they’re permitted to use it without asking you in advance.

CC’s free, easy-to-use licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choosing. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. By default, copyright allows only limited reuses without your permission.

See the presentation below to learn more about Creative Commons and CC licenses. To discuss Creative Commons, Open Access or scholarly publishing issues, contact

Darren Chase (darren.chase@stonybrook.edu), Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication.

RESOURCES

Information Literacy

August 30, 2016 in Information Literacy

What is Information Literacy?

Information Literacy is the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information.

Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning. It is common to all disciplines, to all learning environments, and to all levels of education. It enables learners to master content and extend their investigations, become more self-directed, and assume greater control information keatsover their own learning. An information literate individual is able to:

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally

What is Open Access?

August 30, 2016 in Information Literacy

In terms of scholarly literature, open access applies to digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What it means to academia and research is that the primary barrier to access, price, is removed from the equation, allowing free access to peer-reviewed, scholarly works, books, and just about any other electronic print material with the designation.

"Open Access Publishing" by Darren Chase“Open Access Publishing” by Darren Chase

Open Access works fall under two main publishing categories:

Green Open Access
Free online access to peer-reviewed materials provided by the author (self archived, or published in an institutional repository).

Gold Open Access
Free online access provided by the journal itself, whether the journal is subscription-based, APC (article processing charge)-based, or subsidized. Open access journals can be searchable within a digital publisher’s collection. For example, EBSCO allows the user to limit searching to open access journals.

Open Access at Stony Brook University

General Information

get exCITEd

May 31, 2016 in Information Literacy

john donne

Cite your sources.

Go Wolfie!

May 19, 2016 in Blog

Wolfie feels great about you! High fives!

Open Access

May 18, 2016 in Information Literacy

What is Open Access?

In terms of scholarly literature, “open access” applies to “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions”(Peter Suber). What it means to academia and research is that the primary barrier to access, price, is removed from the equation, allowing free access to peer-reviewed, scholarly works, books, and just about any other electronic print material with the designation.

Open Access works fall under two main publishing categories:

Green Open Access
Free online access to peer-reviewed materials provided by the author (self archived, or published in an institutional repository).

Gold Open Access
Free online access provided by the journal itself, whether the journal is subscription-based, APC (article processing charge)-based, or subsidized. Open access journals can be searchable within a digital publisher’s collection. For example, EBSCO allows the user to limit searching to open access journals.

Open Access at Stony Brook University

General Information

Darren Chase

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